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writing a project on the war. and at the time i was looking at policy issues at the u.s. army war college, and i thought that it was a worthy project because at the time, because i've interest in contemporary korean issues i thought a book about, and, of course, i thought a book about a history of, beginning with the division in 1945 was, could serve as a way in which we could understand contemporary events. so that's sort of the basic reason. but then as i started to get into like the research for the book, or trying to frame what the book, i wanted to write a book that was sort of about, was political and military history but also wanted to include cultural and social history. and i wanted to include all the participants in the war, china, united states, the two koreas, and the soviet union. and as it became apparent to me that i had to take the war beyond the 19533 because of course the war didn't end in a peace treaty. it ended in an armistice. that sort of is why i decided to do really coming from sort of the contemporary issue and an understanding how we got where we are today by lo
and definitely effective. a lot of our regular customers -- it's like us said, the lesson supporters, but in the iowa, got this note. i got an ipad. it's so easy to get a book. we love to but have lost customers that way. not everybody does. we don't lose customers so much is it all by as much as they used to. a think receive a lot of the same people, but the purchases in the size they used to be. it is a constant question of our going to survive in this new environment. publishing, in a precarious position in some days. that's something we think about all the time. there is now resting on your laurels. we're constantly trying to a change and adapt to stay on top of things, like adding e-bucks to our website and having a website that you can order any kind of book on. something we work on all the time. we are on facebook now. we bring in new products. we have more things, nonbook items in the store that people really enjoy. we pay careful attention. we definitely have to stay on top of things and make sure we are checking where we should be going in not just consumer where you going
invites us to lender with the complexities. mary we could start, although it is not a story about you, it is your story of your experience. it is more than a dissertation. even for me it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about graterford, this particular present? >> i tend to think that people are largely a product of the circumstances because i myself am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two, incarceration on the one hand to my child growing up in new york in the 1980's and 90's at a time when the american prison population is exploding, my mother worked rikers island. so i was aware from my young time and a young age about the phenomenon. i was always drawn and horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like a vocation. as for the other piece, i think religious studies is populated by people who tend to be emphatically ambivalence. i fit into that category. there was raised an orthodox jew , although it did not figure that out until later. in fact, my orientation both through judea's a man through american social justi
the special assistant to the president on science technology argues the u.s. is no longer the forefront of the internet revolution. internet capabilities of other countries are faster and cheaper than in the u.s. which could threaten the economic future. this program is about an hour. >> speethree for being with us. >> i look forward to talking with you. >> let's talk about the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> we have a picture that is quite different from the other developed nations. we have the high states of and download speeds in america cable monopolies, local monopolies and each region of the country that dominate that market and so for 85% of americans the only choice where they live is going to be at their local cable monopolists. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world leaders we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a very deep digital divide. so having internet access at home is tied to your economic status some may be about half of people with
and a federal court declared stop in for us to be unconstitutional so momentum is gathering. i think of structure and agency is interdependent. i think it would be messianic to think that my book on its own good raise consciousness but there clearly seems to be a current and i would hope that my book could contribute to a dawning sense that how we do criminal justice is somewhat insane and a moral atrocity. now with respect to where -- i haven't seen orange is the new black yet so where is it on the orange is the new black to the michelle i googled -- alexander spectrum? it's more about the new day and in fact the two men in graterford who read my manuscript repeatedly they might have been frustrated that it wasn't more explicitly policy oriented. i do think there are some policy conclusions that the book makes irresistible and i would hope that readers could come to those on their own. >> host: we can talk about sort of the way in which i think you raise criticisms and invite discussions about solutions. i remember a couple of years ago i had a chance to do a study on sing sing and
on booktv, "after words." .. >> everybody live somewhere and you were telling us where we live in america the end of the suburbs. can you tell us about your title? guest of the main idea behind the book is that more than half a century of expansion into the suburbs the suburbs are at this sort of more than any other place the sort of cultural pillar of america. it embodies the american dream. it's the image of suburbia that people strive for and where most people live but that is changing. it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly over time but every indicator you look at a showing this. we are tiring of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and they are complex and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but, the data the indicators out there, the sense of the american people who live in the suburbs we are really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live. i just thought there was a really momentous trends and one worth delving into so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about these indicators but first i wan
book everybody lives somewhere. and you're telling us the end of the suburbs. can you tell us about the subtitle? >> guest: the main idea behind the book is that more than half a century of expansion into the suburbs coming to know, the suburbs are more than any other place sort of the cultural pillar of america to read it embodies the american dream, it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is what people strive for and where people live but that is changing coming and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes have been slowly over time that every indicator you look at is showing this. we are tired of this way of life and the reasons behind that are numerous and complex and kind of draining away for a number of years. the debt indicators out there, the sort of sense of the american people who live in the suburbs were really looking at a sort of seismic change in how and where we live and i just thought that was a really momentous trend and one with delving into and so i did. >> host: i will be interested to hear about those indicators. but first i wanted to know what
the internet capabilities of other countries are faster and cheaper than in the u.s., which could threaten america's economic future. this program is about an hour. .. we don't have any of the fastest of the five cities in the world but comes to internet access in america, so we're not in the world leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack. we also have a very deep digital divide. having inaccessible kampf is very correlated tear socioeconomic palace. -- have a people have internet connections at home, but that number is even lower for people with incomes under 30,000 per year. rich people tend to have an and also 9 percent of americans cannot access the internet revenue because it has not been built up to their area. >> added we get here? it seems like the internet was started here. what is the divide? why has it not gone to people sums? >> quite a street. a great thing about the internet is that you can reach anybody. that is the whole point. a universal a disability program all idea was that the content provider, like google, would not be subject to the lens of a tele
're telling us where we live in america, the end of the suburbs. could you tell us about your title? >> guest: sure. the main idea behind the book is that after more than a half of a century of expansion into the suburbs, the suburbs are the sort of more than any other place, sort of cultural pillar of america. it's embodies the american dream. it's very -- the image of the house in suburbia is where most people live and strive for. but that is changing and it's changing pretty dramatically. these changes happen slowly but every indicator is showing this. we're tiring of this way of life, and the reason behind that are numerous, and they're complex, and they have been kind of grinding away for a number of years. but the data, the indicators out there, the sort of sense of american people who live in the suburbs, we're really looking at a seismic change in how and where we live, and i just thought that was a really momentous trend. >> host: i'll be very interested to hear about the indicators. first i wanted to know, what inspired you to write this book to look at this momentous trend? >> gues
thank you for being with us. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking with you. >> host: let's start with the basics. what is the status of broadband in america today? >> guest: the picture at america's quite different from the other developed nations. we have god for very high. >> and download. >> in america cable monopolies and local monopolies in each region of the country dominate that market. and for 85% of americans the only choice with a live will be their local cable monopolies. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in america so we are not in the world's leaders. we are somewhere in the middle of the pack and we also have a deep digital divide so having an internet access at home is very tightly correlated to your socioeconomic status or maybe about half of the people with incomes between 30 and $50,000 a year have it at home and the number is lower for people with incomes under $30,000 a year. rich people tend to have internet access at home and also 9% of americans can't buy internet access wherever they live becau
there but i think that what your story and perhaps the tone always invites us to linger with the complexities a little more. maybe we could start although it's not a story about you but your experience and the men that you had a chance to build relationships with. it's more than a dissertation. if you frame it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about the particular prison system or the religion in prison? >> guest: i tend to think people are a product of their circumstances because i am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two modes of incarceration on the one hand, a child growing up in the 1980's and 90's had a time when the american prison population is exploding 600 or 700% and my mother among her others worked on rikers island so i was aware from the young time and at a younger age about the phenomenon of the mass incarceration. and i was always horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like a vacation. as for the other piece, i think the field of religious study is populated by people who tend to be emphatically ambivalent ab
. so i want to get there i think what your story always invites us to linger with the come mixties a little bit more. maybe we can start -- although it's not a story about you, it is your story of your experience and the men you had a chance to build relationships with. it's more than a dissertation. you framed it in your first response, how did you come to write this wonderful book about greaterford, this prison, or religion in prison? >> guest: i tend to think that people are largely a product of their circumstances because i myself am so acutely a product of my circumstances. those two are known -- incarceration on the one hand, child growing up in new york in the 1980s and '90ss at a time when the american prison population is exploding, 600%, 700%, my mother worked at likers island so i was aware from a young time, young age, about the phenomenon as mass incarceration and was always drawn and horrified by it in the way that one is drawn to something like vocation. as for the other piece, i feel the studies are populated by people who tend to be emphatically ambivalent about th
powers used to fill. we should treat this land carefully and we should commemorate, but we shouldn't i think -- there wasn't a consensus or and open space but a lot of families worked very hard to make sure that some portion of land was put aside for a very substantial memorial. there is a kind of give-and-take in the process people have to make compromises and that was a big one for many families that they knew that something would be built and that would be developed when they wanted nothing. >> host: in most battles that we study in history there are the winners and losers and there are heroes and villains. in your book who do you focus on at the end of the day that turn out to be the hero in resolving this battle and who do you in one way or another focus on as a , not enemies but those who were obstacles to a successful getting to yes on the resolution of the battle? >> guest: it's a hard question. this process took so long and was so dysfunctional that there is almost no hero because everyone wants it entered in and it was kind of tarnished at a point. i think some people believe
's an incredibly powerful event and so many things to be changing from that moment on, u.s. policy and domestic policy that within weeks everyone starts asking what do we rebuild? how do we capture the feelings that we are having right now is a country and what kind of architecture would be imagined here? so it started playing out in newspapers and on tv up out the space and how we could possibly put something here to mark this. and so i started reading about this in the papers and i thought i couldn't possibly continue forward with my graduate plan when things i'm interested in and the questions i'm interested in are now playing out right here in new york city. >> host: how much of the early research that you did in the early effort did you engage in and trying to fashion sort of the thesis of "battle for ground zero"? how much of this was your evaluation of political pressures compound economic rushers, pressures of emotional human nature? >> guest: it was all of those things. why is so interesting in why this place is interesting is that concentrates 1/16th acre of the peoples people's land.
powerful event. it was clear that so many things are going to be changing from that moment on. u.s. policy, domestically, foreign policy, but right away within weeks start asking what to we resphwhild how do we capture the feelings that we're having right now as a country in space. what kind of architecture would we imagine here? and so, you know, debate start playing out and pages and newspapers, on tv about the space and how we can possibly put something to mark this. i started reading about this in the paper i thought i couldn't possibly couldn't forward with my graduate plan when the thing i'm interested in and the questions i'm interested in are playing out right here, you know, in new york city. >> host: how much of the early research that you did and the early effort that you engaged in in trying to fashion sort of a thesis of battle for ground zero. how much was your evaluation of political pressures, economic pressures, pressures -- emotional human nature. >> guest: it was all of those things. that was what was so interesting because it concentrated one 16-acre piece of land. you
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15